Living &Studying in Sabah

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Summary

  • Sabah exhibits notable diversity in ethnicity, culture, and language
  • Students may work for a maximum of 20 hours a week during semester breaks and holidays
  • Sabah has two public universities, Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) and Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), as well as numerous private institutions
  • You may apply for student visa through Education Malaysia Global Service online system and track your application

Sabah exhibits notable diversity in ethnicity, culture, and language. Sabah’s horizon is highlighted with dense jungle, with many large rivers running through them. Sabah is also home to Malaysia’s highest mountain, Mt Kinabalu. Sabah is also an enchanting mosaic of cultural diversity with at least 31 indigenous groups. The three main indigenous groups of Sabah are the Kadazan-Dusun, Murut and Bajau. Each has its own unique and rich cultures and interesting traditions. Malaysia has relatively low cost of fees and living expenses which makes it a great option for international students on a budget. It also offers tropical climate, beautiful landscapes and traditional Malay culture juxtaposed with breath-taking modern skyline. Combined with the influences of indigenous groups and the external cultures of India, China and Britain, the region boasts one of the world’s most culturally diverse societies. Although Malaysia is a tolerant and open country, it can be rather conservative in regards to dress code. Being in a modest Muslim country, you should be aware of local norms and respect of the Islamic Law.

Universities in Sabah

Universities of Sydney

Part of Malaysia's plan for higher education expansion is in welcoming international branch campuses, which are run by universities based in other countries. Existing branch campuses include those operated by the UK’s University of Nottingham and Australia’s Monash University. But, while the growing presence of overseas universities in Malaysia is broadening the country’s higher education offering, its home-grown universities should certainly not be overlooked. Malaysia’s higher education system was ranked 27th in the new QS Higher Education System Strength Rankings in 2016, reflecting the strength of its flagship universities. Sabah has two public universities, Universiti Malaysia Sabah (UMS) and Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM). Universiti Tun Abdul Razak (UNIRAZAK) has set up their regional centre in Kota Kinabalu. As of 2016, there is around 15 private colleges, two private university colleges together with other newly established colleges.

Environment

Environment

Malaysia borders with Thailand in West Malaysia, and Indonesia and Brunei in East Malaysia. It is linked to Singapore by a narrow causeway and a bridge. The country also has maritime boundaries with Vietnam and the Philippines. Malaysia is the only country with territory on both the Asian mainland and the Malay archipelago, which contributes to its large biodiversity and wide range of topography from coastal plains rising to hills and mountains. The Strait of Malacca, lying between Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia, is one of the most important thoroughfares in global commerce, carrying 40% of the world's trade. Malaysia is a host to bustling cities, colonial architecture, misty tea plantations, chill-out islands, wild jungles, granite peaks and remote tribes. Known as the Land Below the Wind, Sabah is the second largest state in Malaysia. It is located on the northern portion of the island of Borneo and it shares a border with the province of East Kalimantan of Indonesia in the south. Sabah’s Kinabalu Park and Mount Kinabalu (the highest peak in Southeast Asia), is a popular destination for tourists from around the world. Sabah is also home to a large variety of flora and fauna including the exotic Rafflesia, the world’s largest flower. Sabah has a sweltering tropical rainforest climate with temperature between 27°C to 34°C. Due to its location, it occasionally experiences severe storms as the state is situated south of the typhoon belt.

‘’ Sabah’s Mount Kinabalu is a popular destination for tourists from around the world’’

Working as International Students

Working as International Students

The downside of living in a place where the cost of living is low is that the salaries are also not very high. Wages usually get capped at around MYR 150 for a week’s worth of work. These earnings can be used for minor expenses and you cannot subsist on wages earned by part-time work. Non-Malaysian students are allowed to work on a part-time basis during semester breaks, festive holidays or more than seven days of holiday for a maximum of 20 hours a week. Aside from your student visa, you should also notify your institution and the immigration department. This notice will include a letter from the prospective employer and a non-refundable processing fee of MYR 120. The application to work part-time must be forwarded by the representative of the University to the Immigration Department Headquarters Malaysia. The University must provide a supporting letter allowing the Non-Malaysian student to work, and which includes the dates of the semester breaks. Students will be interviewed, after which the application will be either approved or declined. The passport of students whose application has been approved will be endorsed accordingly. The University is also required to submit a quarterly report to the Immigration Department about the students’ academic progress as the extension of the approval to work will only be given if the student maintains a good academic record.

Social Life

Social Life

Malaysia, especially the urban and resort areas, may look and feel like any other country, but the majority of people are Muslim and, while you are not expected to cover up as much as the locals, you will gain you a great deal of respect by displaying cultural sensitivity. When in doubt, being more modest is better. In addition to dress restrictions, remember that Islamic Law forbids pork products and alcohol; however, there is little expectation that you follow these rules unless you are in public with Malays. Due to the large Chinese population, pork is readily available and the locals are used to seeing people eat pork and in large cities few take any offense at it. Alcohol is also widely available to both the non-Muslims as well as to the tourists, but avoid drinking when in the presence of Muslims. Be more prudent when you are on smaller islands where the overwhelming majority is Muslim; while in cities where the population is more diverse, there is more flexibility. Sabah’s cultural richness is dizzying. The state is known for its traditional musical instrument, the sompoton. The Sabah International Folklore Festival is the main folklore event in Malaysia, other festivals including the Borneo Bird Festival, Borneo Eco Film Festival, Kota Kinabalu Food Fest, Kota Kinabalu Jazz Festival, Sabah Dragon Boat Festival, Sabah Fest and Sabah Sunset Music Festival. Sabah is the only state in Malaysia to celebrate the Kaamatan festival.

Food

Food

Dining in Malaysia is an experience of its own with fusion of culinary styles that have evolved with the arrival of migrant communities over the centuries. Most residents of Malaysia are well-versed with the primary cuisines – Malay, Indian and Chinese – as well as the distinctive style of mixed cultures such as Peranakan and Eurasian cooking. Today, with the influx of students, immigrants and expatriates from different parts of the world like the Middle East, Africa, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent, Malaysia has truly become a gourmet’s paradise. Food from various cultures is becoming increasingly available as there are many new restaurants opening up all the time. In urban centres, there are also numerous international fast-food chains serving burgers, hot dogs, pizzas, fried chicken and many of them have a delivery option. The wide range of options not only exposes Malaysians to different kinds of cuisines, it also caters to the needs of homesick foreigners. Every ethnic group in Sabah has its own cuisine with different styles of preparing, cooking, and the way they serving and eating the food. The indigenous people also features a number of alcoholic drinks such as bahar, kinomol, lihing, montoku, sagantang, sikat and tuak; with the state itself becoming the third highest in alcohol consumption in the country after Kuala Lumpur and Sarawak. Other international shops and restaurants such as for Western food, Middle Eastern food, Bruneian food, Indonesian food, Filipino food, Japanese food, Korean food, Taiwanese food, Thai food and Vietnamese food have their presence here. With the increasing number of tourists on the purpose of culinary tourism, this have since raise the local awareness on the importance of local food to state tourism.

Student Visa

Student Visa

You can apply for student visa as soon as you receive an offer letter from your selected institution. You will need this letter to get Visa Approval Letter (VAL) through Education Malaysia Global Service (EMGS) online application and tracking system. Remember to have all your documents ready and certificates translated into English and notarised. You will also need confirmation from the translator or translation company that it is an accurate translation of the original document, the full name and signature of the translator or of an authorised official of the translation company and the translator or translation company’s contact details. Among the documents they will submit for you is a Personal Bond, for which you will need to pay a fee of around MYR 300 to 1,500, depending on your country of origin. Your document package must be submitted to EMGS along with the non-refundable EMGS fee. It normally takes up to 1 month to complete the verification process by EMGS and VAL issuance, however you need to give about 2-to-3-week buffer during peak period. Aside from VAL, you may also need to apply for a single entry travel visa depending on which country you are from. This travel visa is normally issued within 3 to 30 days from the application day depending on the local embassy.